Ceres Garden Club


I joined a garden club here in Tuscaloosa.

Each month they gather to learn more about how to enhance the yard.

I have a thumb that is NOT green. I have had little luck implementing the ideas in my own yard but am encouraged with each meeting that one day I can keep a plant alive.

Here is a snapshot of some of the meetings, including a tour of the incredible art collection at the Westervelt Museum.

<p style="width:425px;margin-top:0;text-align:center;"><a rel="nofollow" href="http://share.shutterfly.com/action/welcome?sid=0BatWTls1buHMA&cid=SFLYOCWIDGET&eid=118">Click here to view this photo book larger</a>

Create a gorgeous, high quality wedding photo album at Shutterfly.com.

“>click HERE to View the book

Lake Homes Realty ~ Combining all the Things I Love


You are the first to know that I have found a way to use all of the things I love in one great endeavor,

sharing my love of the South (like in Southern Scribblings which is now on autopilot with orders through Lulu.com and Amazon.com)

sharing my love of the LAKE (as in my column with Lake Living in the monthly newspaper in Tuscaloosa)

Click the link to experience the ducks, sailboats and all of the reasons I love Lake Tuscaloosa, while

sharing my love of blogging and writing

and my interest in photography (Listings on my site will have creative, enhancing photos to amplify all of the great memories and experiences within your home)

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my love for grilling on the lake watching the Alabama Crimson Tide (for Bama fans, fewer Auburn colors on THIS year-round water lake)

my interest in writing ~  I want to paint the scene with words to help capture the personality of the place

my interest in social media ~ I will continue to feed fun and important posts to the REALTOR FACEBOOK page

my vow to promise to help people understand the value of what they are selling and buying based on actual MLS REALTOR data and not some “formula” concocted from entries. ACRE is right here in Tuscaloosa with monthly reports on trends and all things Real Estate related.

View all of the listings on Lake Tuscaloosa on our website.

I believe in the POWER OF THE INTERNET.

Lakehomes.com is a trusted company with proven results to drive people who are SPECIFICALLY LOOKING for lake homes while searching from all the way across the country.

LHR is based in Birmingham (Pelham is the head office) and are forward thinking.

Read about them here:

At the Water’s Edge ~ B- Metro Magazine

2015 Women to Watch- Birmingham Business Journal

I love it that she’s TECHY (no I’m not brown-nosing..I’M EXCITED!)

Fast Track 30: Lake Homes Realty #8

LAKE HOMES REALTY of West Alabama

I am the local contact here in Tuscaloosa, serving

Lake Tuscaloosa

Holt Lake

Million Dollar This is a ZILLOW link but find my profile info by searching for sale in 35406 or 35473

Bankhead Lake

and areas such as Northwood Lakes in Northport

hoping to help YOU SELL YOUR HOME in these areas to those searching from computers nationwide FOR LAKEFRONT PROPERTY (let us show you the monthly printouts of who is looking at Lake Tuscaloosa, from New York to California).

Are they finding YOUR home? Or is it lost in the shuffle?

BUYERS~

We make it easy to find information- if looking for lake property ANYWHERE IN THE SOUTHEAST, it’s there on LAKEHOMES.com.

We make it fun to find your spot on the lake. My office is on Lake Tuscaloosa so you can also view the property by water to get a better idea of the location from town and where you want to be.

Looking for property OFF THE LAKES?

Search properties on my website allisonadamsrealtor.com

You can simply text me an address to my phone (205 NINE one FOUR ~twenty four hundred) and within an hour I usually can send you a full report on the property. I take phone calls and emails as well, but TEXT is the quickest way for a response. My clients can (ok almost, I do sleep) always find me.

As a member of MLS, the National Association of REALTORS, The Alabama Association of REALTORS and our local board I can get access on properties across the state.

I have a strong presence on other WEBSITES in Real Estate.

Find my profile info alongside homes for sale by searching in 35406 or 35473

I can assure you if I can’t find information on the property you are interested in I will probably just knock on the door!

I hope you will pass my information along to anyone considering buying or selling a lake home.

I can’t wait to work with you or someone you know!

Allison

SATURDAY EVENTS IN TUSCALOOSA


Bark2 Logo

is a special event created by THE TUSCALOOSA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS to help raise funds for the Will May Dog Park at Sokol Park in Tuscaloosa.

Click here for the PROGRAM AND NEWSLETTER

I have loved getting to know all of the REALTORS in Tuscaloosa and being a part of such a great event.

I created/designed the newsletter this year, since I will NOT be able to be at the event.

The DRUID CITY ARTS FESTIVAL is the same day

and I will have a booth there again this year. Hope you will jump in and enjoy the day

with ALL three events!

including the LAKE CLEANUP.

Saturday will prove to be a GREAT day to get out and enjoy the beautiful weather.

(See my article that advises the same in the latest issue of DRUID CITY LIVING in my Lake Living column!

CURRENT ISSUE LINK HERE~

Have a BLESSED day..and don’t forget to bathe your 4 legged friends (let the boy scouts do it…all in the name of the GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS!)

Allison

 

Happy National REALTOR Day


Today is National REALTOR Day.

I  began my real estate career in 1994 after working ten years in commercial interior design. My last day of work as a full time 8-5 employee was just a few days before I went into labor with my first child. He is now 21.

Being a REALTOR (the title is trademarked) means you are a real estate agent who is a member of the Association of REALTORS and complete education and professional requirements every two years to be up to date on laws, marketing information as well as technology.

I, like many who ask me about being a Realtor, believed this career would provide me with a flexible job that would work well with my “child rearing responsibilities”. I got my license shortly after he was born thinking I could “be at home more” with him. Little did I know the time and effort that goes into a transaction.

Back then, there was barely an internet. The REALTOR was the gatekeeper with all of the secret information, your guide, your counselor. We scheduled our appointments by telephone, fewer times by cell phone. We drove our clients around in our vehicles. Today buyers like to be in their own vehicles for the most part. We printed out paper to show the home information and delivered contracts by hand. Fax was the fast way and usually a response came a few days later.

As far as flexibility of schedules are concerned, my first years in real estate I often had a two and four year old in the car eating cereal snacks and watching a VHS tape of Barney in the small TV I had rigged to play in my Suburban. It was not the glamorous or predictable lifestyle I had dreamed of. Quite often, people wanted to see the properties just as they were getting off work or on weekends in the middle of soccer practice.

Today, my schedule is still flexible, and thanks to the internet I can email a response as well as a dozen photos in a few minutes. The difference now is that I might be making deals at night with a response expected immediately. Technology is a must for today’s Realtor. I also have a child who is older than my two back then, and more adaptable as well.

This generation of buyers is much more savvy and you can bet they have done their homework. They usually know what they are looking for or have researched the schools or narrowed down to a location. In fact, sometimes they find properties that we are not aware of, thanks to some of those mega information sites that may or may not provide accurate information.

Many families choose to sell their homes themselves, making the job of the Realtor more challenging as there is not a uniform cross section of data for us to use while making a home search for our clients. Most home sellers are also savvy and are willing to work with agents who represent buyers.

A most awkward moment occurs for a for sale by owner seller when the buyer decides to make an offer. Perhaps the items being negotiated for that were not spelled out in a document such as we have through MLS (multiple listing service) that lets you know grandmother’s chandelier will be REMOVED at purchase. These are the things that a Realtor can help a buyer address, as well. We are also required to update the status of properties promptly so if you use www.realtor.com you are assured to have up to the minute information.

Sites created for sale by owner advertising provide an avenue for pictures as well as general information, but they lapse in the service that has again become the thing that attracts clients to the Realtor. That is the renewed definition in the role as the gatekeeper.

With valuables being in the home, medications that are often targeted, and safety concerns it is important for homeowners to be wary of the risks of opening your home to a complete stranger.

As a Realtor, I take it as my responsibility to meet with a client if possible before showing a home. A qualification from a bank helps the client know exactly what our target market is and gives them confidence in a firm offer. This also avoids our bothering homeowners that might not be in that price range but whose property may be of initial interest to the potential buyer.

In addition, I usually ask for a copy of a drivers license. We cannot be too careful, for ourselves or our client’s who are opening their homes as they offer them for sale.

While Realtors are still defining their roles in the world of home buying and selling, the best plus for a home seller is the marketing expertise they receive. With Realtors networking weekly, having caravans and open houses for fellow professional members of their boards of Realtors, you can assure when you hire one Realtor, you are getting the force of the membership behind you as well.

Whether you sell by owner or hire a REALTOR, remember we are all working for the same goal, to help you or someone else enjoy the American dream of owning their own home.

I hope if you see a Realtor today who is rushing to and fro, obviously working a deal on a cell phone at dinner with their family at a restaurant or at the soccer field, give them a big hug! They will gratefully appreciate it!

Blessings to my REALTOR friends who raise the bar each and every day!

duckworthredfacebook

Allison Adams

Allison sells real estate in Tuscaloosa, home of Alabama’s Crimson Tide and writes her Lake Living Column for Druid City Living Newspaper from Lake Tuscaloosa. Get info on properties available in her area of Alabama at www.allisonadamsrealtor.com

BAG 101 ART SHOW THURSDAY for First Thursday Northport~ Allison Adams


Bag 101

will  be representing my GIRLFRIENDS Series

 

 

 

girlfriendsallisonpadams.com

 

Stop by Bag 101 

205-722-2298

312 Merchants Walk Suite 6

in Northport 

(McFarland between Zoe’s and Talbots)

 

FIRST THURSDAY ARTWALK 

NORTHPORT

 THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 4

Drop by between 12-6:30

for some refreshments 

and to say HI.

I will be there all day.

 

The entire store has been arranged around my newest paintings!

 

I hope to see you!

 

Allison Adams

ARTIST

 

 

 

Lake Tuscaloosa Living


BAMA FANS!

Wondering what the lake here in Tuscaloosa is REALLY about?

Check out the new website.

http://www.laketuscaloosaliving.com

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As a Realtor and someone who LOVES the lake we would be excited to take you on a private tour by boat. 

Get pre-qualified now at 205-451-5510 and we will help you find your little slice of Lake Tuscaloosa Heaven!

Looking forward to an incredible season of BAMA Football, Tailgating and ending the afternoons watching the sun set on the lake!

Why choose Lake Martin and 280 traffic when this little gem is right down the road!

The most current article in my Lake Living Column can be found at www.druidcityliving.com on STAY-Cations.

Blessings!

Allison 

Artist, Author of four books, Realtor with Duckworth Morris Real Estate Lake Tuscaloosa ~ Alabama

Artist, Author of four books, Realtor with Duckworth Morris Real Estate
Lake Tuscaloosa ~ Alabama

Books2PRISONS Event : Northport


This morning I woke up on a mission to keep the momentum going on a book I have been writing for a long time. It is not finished, but definitely a part of my bucket list!

I didn’t have to go far to get inspired. In Northport at the Civic Center the first ever Book ‘Em Event was getting started. Marlin Barton

The opening speaker, Marlin Barton, from Montgomery Alabama (actually grew up in Forkland, Alabama) was my creative writing teacher at Huntington College. He reminded me today that he started in the program working with kids who are incarcerated at Mt. Meigs in 1997. I think that was about when I was taking his class, aspiring to figure out all there is to know about poetry and creative writing.

Today, almost twenty years later, I am still in awe of the things writers are doing to make a difference in our world.

One of those places is in our prisons. Jeannie Thompson, Director of the Alabama Writers Forum   ( Alabama Writers Forumhttp://books2prisons.wordpress.com/), is the founder of this project after a visit during Christmas to some youth who would spend the holidays behind bars.

The group is on their Seventeenth issue, with Marlin as Director. Open the Door 16 is available at his events for free, a candid look into the hearts and minds of these students who crave books in the libraries as escape and perhaps peace among the clanging solitude they are experiencing behind bars.

He also shared some information on a project they did with the University of Illinois where students there of photography sent photos for Mt. Meigs students to write about. They in turn shared poems that the Illinois students created photography for. The story is HERE.

Marlin read some of the poems written by his students. Mt. Meigs now has nearly 150 boys in their high security prison. His classes allow 30-40 “kids” between the ages of 12-18 to unravel the hurt and remorse they each hold inside and produce something beautiful from a life that for most of them is quite ugly.

Marlin also read from his book, The Cross Garden, fiction based on his seventeen years of experience with these kids. 

 

Rene Denfeld

The event includes authors from across the state as well as Rene Denfeld, author of The Enchanted. Mrs. Denfeld works for clients in Oregon who receive the death penalty in an effort to interview and understand those who affected this person as well as record witnesses to the crimes they have committed. 

“I am blessed by the people telling their stories, although often horrific. It is not my place to judge, but to get a deeper set of truths,” she told the audience, mostly writers.

She talked about publishing, as she has been writing during all of the peaks and valleys of the publishing industry. She began writing in newspaper and for anything she could find before finding an agent. Her work is being used in schools today to teach high school students about writing. Her stories began with interview of kids on the streets, and these days are fiction, based on her work in prisons, as she is bound by confidentiality in her daily life.

The Enchanted is a collaboration of all of the witnesses she has grown to know over the years, as seen through a female character. 

A visitor in the room called this book, “A life changer!”

I look forward to reading my signed copy. 

University of Alabama professor, Joanne J. Terrell MSW, LCSW was there to talk to the audience with Mrs. Denfeld about her work as a death penalty investigator (she is one of the few in this line of work in the Southeast and the only in Alabama to be able to testify). A fascinating look into the world of the mind of a death row inmate, this discussion no doubtably ran over into the lunch break. 

Anyone who has interest in writing in this region should put this event on your calendar if it is held again next year. The talent in the room was inspiring and approachable.

After break T. Michael Hankins shared illustrations and Michelle Lowry Combs, author of Heir to the Lamp was on hand to talk about her book.

A skype interview with author Kirby Howell of Autumn in the City of Angels and Autumn in the City of Lights.

Poets: Irene Latham, Doris Davenport, Georgia Ann Banks-Martin, Jerri Beck

Bill Fitts : Author of The Needed Killing Series

Needed to Be Killed Series

Authors attending:

Rene Denfeld, Marlin Barton, Georgia Ann Banks-Martin, Dean Bonner, Carolyn Breckenridge, John David Briley, Tanya Eavenson, Bill Fitts, Carolyn Haines, Trudier Harris (Summer Snow: Reflections from a Black Daughter of the South) , Nancy Dorman-Hickson, Wynora Freeman, Irene Latham, Carroll Dale Short, Earl Tilford (author Turning the Tide- The University of Alabama in the 60’s), Taylor Watson, Veronica Wynn-Pruitt, Kirby Howell, Debbie Herbert and James L. Noles, Jr.

INSIDE THE VAULTTaylor Watson brought Inside the Vault, a collaboration with the
University of Alabama featuring items and information from The Museum at the University where he works.

 

Jeremy Satcher

Jeremy Satcher brought his graphic novel series.

Doris Davenport is hosting an event called 100 Thousand Poets for Change on September 27, 2014 in Tuscaloosa, noon -4pm. If you would like to get involved, (poets, musicians, activists) contact her at ddavenport@stillman.edu 

 

 

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If you live in Tuscaloosa and want to meet other writers while honing your talent and getting inspired:

The Guild of Professional Writers for Children meets on the Second Saturday of each month from 10-12 noon at the Rotary Room at the Tuscaloosa Library.

The Tuscaloosa Christian Writers- Meet on the Last Tuesday of the Month in The Rotary Room at the Library at 6:30 PM.

Lake Living


 

Lake Living

I was given the opportunity to write a column (and articles) for a local community paper here in Tuscaloosa called Druid City Living. Watch for it in your mailbox each month. It can be found online at Druidcityliving.com.  I share a few of the articles here to quench your thirst. Hoping to have you hooked on all things about the lake and Tuscaloosa (Northport) Lake Living. Allison

There is something magical about nature.

Step out of the car after a long day and get a glimpse of a lake, a stream, or a tree in bloom and watch your cares drop away, at least for that moment.

Here in Tuscaloosa, residents have the opportunity to enjoy year round access to the Black Warrior River, Lake Tuscaloosa and nature at every turn.

I moved to Lake Tuscaloosa from Birmingham in May 2013 after 10 years as a writer, artist and realtor. Birmingham has a couple of great community papers and magazines, some which I have written for. When I saw Druid City Living, I was excited. I begged for a chance to share all I love about living on Lake Tuscaloosa.

It is my goal in this monthly column to write about unique activities that take place on and around the 177 miles of shoreline and the banks of local rivers and streams. Alabama boasts football, but we are also home to the greatest freshwater biodiversity in the nation. Combine that with mountains and sandy beaches and you have to puff up a bit when realizing this place is pretty spectacular.

For this column, we welcome your stories, big catch photos, and look forward to interviewing those who make the waterfront their home. We will feature activities that take place on the lake.

In my four or so years as a Bama student some years ago I crossed the spillway, but never explored the lake. I grew up near here in West Alabama (Livingston) and married on Lake Tuscaloosa. The intimate cabin at NorthRiver Yacht Club was to be the site before it became an extravaganza suited for the crystal room with 12 bridesmaids and 14 groomsmen. To say it is ironic that I will retire here with my husband of 10 years would be an understatement. I lived on the beach for four years. Before moving here, I lived in Crestline and we had a home on Lake Martin. Residents here may not recognize the unique, quiet, non-fluctuating treasure nestled in our own backyard. I’ll try my best not to share this with those in Birmingham who haven’t realized this is far better and closer than Lake Martin.

In the winter at Lake Martin, the water level drops significantly due to Alabama Power fluctuations. Here, I can barely see a change. Year round, when bizarre warm weather rolls across the cliffs, we could slip out on the water, or at least put our toes in at the dock.

There are dozens of neighborhoods that call the lakeside home and a number of rural areas that keep her shores wild with deer and turkey. Just down the street from me is a parcel of land I dream of with a barn, acreage and water frontage. A stone’s throw from there is a public island ready for anyone to pop a tent and have a campfire and across the road, a quaint planned development with a shared pool and public boat docks. Cliff tops boast million-dollar refuges just beyond this tranquil spot. All of this is surrounded by Northport’s treasured artsy cuisine spots and convenient to grocery stores. It is less than 12 minutes (five miles north) from downtown Tuscaloosa’s great restaurants and shops.

Make it a priority to get outside and soak in nature, whether in the woods or around any water.  

Blessings as we head into boating season. I’m looking forward to sharing your memories, both past and those you make this summer.

From the January issue.

Allison is an artist/ photographer/ author and REALTOR with Duckworth Morris Real Estate.  www.facebook.com/allisonadamsrealtor

 

The Magic of the Musician


 

I recently watched the PBS Special on Muscle Shoals. It reminded me of the diamonds we have here in Alabama, in terrain, beautiful cities, country lanes, beaches and mountains, and then there is the music. Watching acts like Bono, The Almann Brothers and the Stones talk about the “magic” in Alabama almost brought tears to my eyes.

I got the same feeling recently when I got to hear Chuck Leavell speak his heart about music and forestry in the South.

Chuck was guest speaker at the Savannah Book Festival, which I was able to read at during the Ossabaw Island Writer’s Retreat. His love for forestry won my heart. He and his wife share a special bond of love for nature and forest landowner as a profession as well as stewardship for the US.allisonpadams.com.

By Allison Adams

Chuck Leavell is no stranger to America. World tour keyboardist for he Rolling Stones, a Lifetime Achievement Grammy Award winner for work with the Almann Brother’s Band and in recent years, Chuck has been pianist on John Mayer albums, with Eric Clapton and even Miranda Lambert. He is also no stranger to Tuscaloosa, where he grew up after moving here at the age of nine. Many remember his band, the Misfitz, who performed on Friday nights at the YMCA just blocks away from The Bama Theatre when Chuck was back in town on November 8 with the Randall Bramblett Band to play a benefit concert for the Bama Theatre Restoration Fund.

The vibe was electric as Chuck sang a few Rolling Stones favorites and his originals. From the balcony to the stage, fans sang along. His fingers were in overdrive on songs like “Jessica” and the communication between him and fans in the audience resembled that of “coming home.”

Chuck and his wife, Rose Lane, who have been married more than 40 years, greeted guests, old friends and chatted with some new fans after the show while he showcased his newest passion, writing. 

His latest, “Growing A Better America,” was showcased at the Savannah Book Festival. Songwriters such as John Denver, Jackson Browne and bands like U2 have been singing to the world about global issues, and like these, Chuck and his wife live out their message. They live on Charlane Plantation, 2,500 acres outside of Macon, Georgia, that were left to his wife by her parents. After years paying inheritance taxes to “buy back what was theirs,” they vowed to have it as a self-sustaining property. They have won numerous awards through the state of Georgia for their research and stewardship, and Chuck has been made an honorary Ranger.

“Growing A Better America” highlights his research and ideas to make more productive in developing our greatest asset, land, with examples of projects that “do it right”. As a Georgia resident, it concerns him that the state is losing 19,000 acres of natural land a year. He has co-founded Mother Nature Network with 222,000 followers on Facebook. 

In recent months in Alabama, a “secret” private investor acquired 73,000 acres of prime timberland mainly used now for hunting and timber surrounding Birmingham. Perhaps that will remain green but who is to say? Unless we all take heart, we too may find ourselves without green places to roam.

Alabama has the third most timberland acreage (22.9 million acres/ nearly 68% of the total land area) behind only Georgia and Oregon, according to the Alabama Forestry Commission. Being one of the only states with navigable waters that flow to the Gulf, there are also logistical advantages.

Alabama is in the forefront for reforestation (begun in Alabama by pioneer E.F. Allison with Allison Lumber Company in Bellamy) as well as game management tactics he devised to assure that dwindling populations would turn into the boom of deer populations we see today. Timber expansion in Alabama is ahead of removal by 23 percent with 1.1 million acres since 1978 when numbers were at 650,000 acres according to amazingalabama.com.

In Alabama, everyone has the opportunity to experience the woods, aspire to own land and cultivate the green space that God has given us. If we each, according to Chuck, just consider our individual carbon footprint we can make great strides in the right direction. To learn more about Chuck’s book or his endeavors, find him at chuckleavell.com or charlane.com.

Author Allison Adams is a forest landowner, photographer/writer and Realtor with Duckworth Morris in Tuscaloosa. http://www.allisonpadams.com

Photo credit: Allison Adams

Ed and Fred designed the guitar straps for the Rolling Stones.

Ed and Fred designed the guitar straps for the Rolling Stones.

My son, Brent, is a music major in the New College at Bama with an emphasis in Production.

My son, Brent, is a music major in the New College at Bama with an emphasis in Production.

 

Quality REALTORS in Tuscaloosa


 

As a writer, it is sometimes hard to pay the bills, so we fall back on the things we know. When I was a young girl I sat around at our hunting camp and overheard a group of men talk about some girls in Coatopa whose parents had passed away.  “Those girls have no idea what that land is worth” rang in my ears all of my life. As a daughter of a single mom who had land, I vowed to always stay ahead of the curve. I know. I have quite a bit to learn, as real estate is always changing, but I encourage any woman to seek help before selling ANYTHING and I will be happy to help!

While I have been in Real Estate nearly 20 years, being a newbie in Montgomery, having a company with a partner, then owning my own company on the Gulf Coast during the peak times, I wasn’t sure after my third child was born that I would continue. After moving to Tuscaloosa I met the group I am with now and am loving being a part of the Duckworth team. Not only is this family entrenched in all things Tuscaloosa, but they are the “good guys” in Real Estate. It is comforting to find a place with such moral character.

Since being in the Tuscaloosa Area Association of Realtors I have come to know many of the Realtor members through a charity event I am involved in for Bark in the Park, which will be held at the Will May Dog Park at PARA (Park and Recreation Authority) in Northport.  Tuscaloosa, as Jo Bonner shared in our recent membership meeting, is blessed to have a Realtors group that works together.

Joe Duckworth, Jr. is on the board of PARA. I am amazed that a small community has such incredible riches in extracurricular activities. The amenities there are unlike any I have seen. It is all because of volunteers such as he and his family who make these things possible.

This Dog Park is named after Will May, a young boy who was killed in a hunting accident. The May family is in the veterinarian business and dogs were Will’s soft spot. The weekend before Bark in the Park, there is also a 5K Run in his memory. This community continues to pull together to support this family and see that his memory continues to make Tuscaloosa a better place.

The website for the event on the 17th is HERE.

Beside the dog park is a full fledged PUBLIC horse riding rink and facility for shows or practice. Across the street, are private stables and training facilities for students to take classes.

Rounding out the park is the Model Aircraft field (see former story) as well as a full fledged baseball park.

PARA has a number of locations with gym memberships, art classes, pools and events for children of all ages throughout the year.

Tuscaloosa is an EASY sell for families, making Real Estate a comfortable place to be if you are simply spreading the word about all of the GOOD things in Tuscaloosa, in addition to the sports.

New Members are being added each term.

Visit http://www.tuscaloosaassociationofrealtors.com for recent members.

These were the November Inductees who joined the ranks with me.

I recently sold a house for someone who tried a “by owner” approach prior to letting me help. She told me it was “so easy it made her nervous.” I take that as a GOOD review. I encourage you to use a professional, any here. With all of the continuing education we receive, many times FREE, there are plenty of knowledgeable agents. This membership has given me twice the number of hours I need this year just because I enjoy them so!

I also invite you to visit Duckworth Morris realty at www.duckworth.com to search for YOUR place in Tuscaloosa or to sign up to take the Real Estate pre license course.

New Tuscaloosa REALTORS sworn in:

During the Tuscaloosa Association of REALTORS Luncheon at Indian Hills Country Club, the new REALTOR Induction and Swearing in Ceremony was conducted by Brenda Wallace, with designated brokers presenting pins to: Allison Adams, Duckworth Morris; Kirk Eaton, Corder Real Estate; Rachel Ellison, Duckworth Morris; Matt Farris, Farris Real Estate; Nick Hardy, Realty Executives; Erica Jones, Russell Realty; Leslie Knox, Hamner Real Estate; Rhonda Mosley, RealtySouth; Brandon Roberts, Duckworth Morris; Karen Schille, Realty South; Josh Smith, Prudential Pritchett-Moore; and Ken Worley, Patton Realty.

NewRealtors1NewRealtors2

Uh, that is me, stage right. The Tuscaloosa Association of Realtors is a cohesive group of friends helping families.

Uh, that is me, stage right. The Tuscaloosa Association of Realtors is a cohesive group of friends helping families.

 

Jo Bonner UA Vice Chancellor Addresses the Tuscaloosa REALTORS Association


 

UA Vice Chancellor Jo Bonner discusses economic development in Tuscaloosa

By Allison Adams

The Tuscaloosa Area Association of REALTORS hosted Jo Bonner, University of Alabama Vice Chancellor and former U. S. Congressman, to share his views on Tuscaloosa’s economic development.

Bonner addressed nearly three hundred Realtors with a question: “How effective do you think the growth here in Tuscaloosa is progressing?” The room raised their hands after he asked how many thought it favorable.

“How effective do you think the economy is progressing as a nation?” he proceeded. There were only a few hands.

“How many of you want your taxes to increase?” he asked. No hands. Bonner informed the group of a recent talk he did where 80 percent of the crowd answered “Yes,” before quoting a recent Arkansas Democratic Gazette article which stated that the “U.S. must increase the national debt before it is too late.”

Bonner spoke of the many challenges facing our nation, stating that sometimes we just want to turn off the television. He encouraged all Americans to continue, as Tuscaloosa has, to push through with great strength, as shown by Nick Saban and his football team, as well as through activities such as the coat and can drive that went on just before he spoke to help those around us.

“America knows Tuscaloosa. Not only for great football, but as we know, we can all be in need in an instant. The Tuscaloosa Tornadoes showed the world how great this city is as they pulled together and not only re-built, but made it better,” Bonner said.

Jo Bonner thanked University of Alabama System Chancellor Dr. Robert Witt for bringing him to Tuscaloosa four months ago to join in what he called a “most impressive community.”

“Be very optimistic,” he praised, as he shared statistics on Tuscaloosa’s unfounded growth, as shared by Grayson Glaze, Associate Director of Alabama Center for Real Estate, at the University of Alabama System.

In 2008, 151 residential homes sold just before the recession began. Last year, 131 homes sold in the Tuscaloosa area. This year 180 sold. When America saw “anemic policies in Washington” in 2009 and 2010, there was actually a growth pattern in Alabama and Tuscaloosa not seen elsewhere. When an average house price here was $156,000 in 2009, it actually increased to $168,000 soon afterwards. Today, there is a $10,000 gap in average sales since 2008, with our average home price today at $178,000.

Bonner also spoke of great things regarding industry in Alabama, with Mercedes-Benz having a 20 year anniversary this year being in the United States and on Alabama soil. Today, Alabama is the fifth largest automotive state because it took a $250 million gamble. Growth projections are showing Alabama as the third largest in the next five years.

Airbus Alabama is making a stake in U.S. production in Mobile. 55,000 jobs exist now in the automotive industry that did not exist. The C-Class will join the ranks of U.S. manufactured Mercedes inventory.

Bonner spoke humbly of his upbringing in Monroeville and the blessed opportunity to work with an institution such as The University of Alabama.

“The University is the largest employer in the state,” he said. “And Tuscaloosa is the only city in the state to be home to a governor, two members of congress and an impressive young mayor making big changes in Tuscaloosa’s position in this state.”

When Dr. Witt came to the University there were 28,000 students. This year, there are 33,000, with an 81 percent growth in a decade. No flagship in America has achieved this. Bonner spoke of the quality of students at the University of Alabama with 28 percent of them never making a B. The faculty has increased by 47 percent, with goods and service needs trickling out into our neighborhoods and retail stores.

“Don’t sell your profession or the need for your relationships in the community short,” he told the Realtors Association. “You are helping people make the largest purchase of their lives and the next decade promises to be even better than Tuscaloosa’s past.”

Nikki Simmons, Executive Vice President of TAR, accepted the MAKING A DIFFERENCE AWARD presented by Moody Radio on behalf of the 370 realtors and 85 affiliates who make a difference in our community. The group collected coats and canned goods for area residents in need during the meeting.

“I am so proud of our members and the difference they make in our community and that they received the recognition they deserve,” Simmons said.

To find a REALTOR member in your area visit tuscaloosarealtors.com.

Photo Credit: Allison Adams

Allison is as REALTOR member of the Tuscaloosa Association of Realtors and a Women’s Division of the Chamber of Commerce and would love to help you take part in owning a piece of Tuscaloosa and West Alabama. Two O Five-914-2400 or allisonpadams AT gmail dot com.

 

 

Lake Living: Art In Nature


I have found, in living on the beach as with living on the lake, that while we can set up tent on the shores of nature, God is in complete control. While residing for three years on West Beach in Gulf Shores, I became in tune with every breeze, display of sunset, and the ease of unwinding into the end of a day. I was aware of each popup storm that blew past, as it tossed umbrellas and spewed sand. We were forced to move inland at least three times because of hurricane threats and tropical storms, towing dogs, cats and kids. For the next 10 years, I lived in the city. I found I lost count of sunsets and even the shape and size of the moon most of the time. 

This past month’s ice event shut that city down, showing us that we can prepare, but we can never be ready for everything that nature has in store. 

I was in my home on the lake the entire week of Snowpocalypse 2014. All became still on Lake Tuscaloosa the day after the snow blew across the South, although I have heard there was a pontoon out that afternoon to take in the white wonderland vistas from the water.

I watched as icicles formed, growing longer each day as the ice refused to melt. Tracks in the snow reminded me that these are not our woods. I actually had time to fill the bird feeder that I glance at on the way out the door to meetings and carpool, thinking maybe I should refill it, despite the squirrels. 

My dogs, who associate the woods with our camp house and freedom, we try to contain. Their excitement is buzzing as much as that of the kids in the neighborhood. Through their eyes we can re-connect with our inner child, embracing the magic of snow. 

On the lake, only a few days before the ice storm, I sat on my deck in shorts, soaking in the warm sunshine and watching a sailboat putter out to the point until it raised its sail, capturing the wind for fuel that would push it across the open water.

Each day, as I putter back to home base, tired and hungry, I am reminded why we live. As an artist, as well as a writer, I look at life as art. 

Colors are beautiful when they are significant,I read in “The Art Spirit” by Robert Henri, beside a warm fire. He died in 1929, but any artist who has studied the notes from his classes realizes his wisdom is timeless. 

Life is beautiful when it is significant. Many of us live life being simply present. Quoting from Henri on a day when I have nothing else to do because I am locked in by Mother Nature, I write as I read, It takes wit, and interest and energy to be happy. The pursuit of happiness is a great activity. One must be open and alive. It is the greatest feat man has to accomplish and the spirits must flow.

Life and spirit, I am convinced while surrounded by it, flow most naturally in nature. 

I look back on the ten years in the city and while I loved that time, I am happy to be back in the throws of nature. While in Birmingham, we took the time to explore every restaurant, outdoor cafe, music festival, and cultural event that we could fit into our weekends. We would drag the kids along, all in the name of exposure to the things in life,to Bible studies, art shows, festivals, garage sales, and plays. We would have date nights to motorcycling spots, RV adventures, beer pubs, wine tastings and fundraisers. We lost sense of what God was doing outside of our self-orchestrated circle of life.

Today, just a few days after the ice has melted and a warm rain plummets on the roof across the rocky yard and into the lake, the waterfalls blast with activity to again remind me of the power of nature. Just beyond the hilltops I catch a glimpse of one ray of sun piercing through a cloud as it illuminates the water for only a second before fading back to shadow. 

Tonight, or perhaps tomorrow, or whenever Mother Nature agrees to move onward, I will make a point to step beyond the porch and find what that moon has been up to. Again, I have lost track. Maybe right now I am missing a rainbow as I write. Art is always being created by nature even when we arent looking.

Heres hoping you have a peaceful run-in with nature. Until we meet again, be sure to gather those photos of you and your love of nature, the lake, or your love for anything for that matter. Because in life, the greatest of all is love, and it is February, the month for no excuses!

Photo: Allison Puccetti Adams

Colors of the Lake acrylic, by Allison Adams. 

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A REAL Person’s Life~ In the Closet


If you are like me, mornings are enough of a challenge without the worry of entering the war zone of the closet. Not only are you fighting with reruns of items, but also with the image of yourself fighting some stranger in your mirror when you pull out that outfit you thought was going to work as it always had. And the less time you have to get ready, the more difficult it seems to be to find something to throw on. And let me back up a second here, to address those who say they “simply threw something on in the morning”. I’m calling the bluff, as a person who routinely loses her closet beneath a stack of shirts that fit awkwardly, had a stain, pants that “used to fit”, and shoes that “looked so cute in the box” but look ridiculous on your foot when put with the outfit you purchased them with. 

Now there are some, lets just call them blessed, who can wake up and slap on a t-shirt and stylish exercise gear (theirs probably without the dog fur mine are coated in), pop their hair in a ponytail, slather a bit of gloss on their lips to highlight that natural blush they were born with and head out the door.  They look refreshed, they look pulled together. I sit on the floor of my closet quite often and wonder where that person went, as I love to think I had that gift once upon a time.

I love my closet, don’t get me wrong. I appreciate the space I have now. As I roll towards the age of fifty, I remember all too well the dark caves of space I once climbed into, digging for shoes in an abyss of sharp corners and muddy boots. I remember the bi-fold doors that wouldn’t close, no matter how hard I slammed. I remember one night when the whole closet came crashing down from the weight of all of my clothes on one rod. Some of my clothes have been with me as long as my twenty year old child. I am not a hoarder because I like to call it organized “possession”, something my family just doesn’t understand. I’ve had regular moves to thank for the fact that I am able to recycle all of the styles I have hung onto. And lo and behold, I’ve seen the seven year cycles come to pass, just a few years ago wondering, “Now WHERE is that that big brass circle belt I wore in college! My daughter just bought one!” 

Technology has actually brought that cycle a bit tighter, as universal trends cycle quicker and various ridiculous past trends are easily manufactured into high fashion once again. I have teens. I have been to the vintage shops with them, and often say, “You should just wear mine! I have this!”

I’ve done a heavy clean of my closets only twice in my the past twenty of my 47 years. I still remember the items I miss, a long leather coat with a big hood I wish I still had when in the woods and a red cropped leather jacket with silver brads I wore during our Harley Davidson days, that was NOT a Harley jacket. I recently saw one in In Style and wondered why once again I let my friends strong arm me into “letting go”. So I may not ever wear it again, but dang-it, I would have the option if I felt the urge.

I am not the fashionista of my family, far from it. I still remember the days when my mother was in her thirties and our dad told a friend, “if S….was in style, she would wear it!” I grew up shopping in a number of Tuscaloosa clothing establishments, their owners even telling my daughter who is eight, “I remember when your Mama was your age, I would try to tie those clothes around her. She hated shopping but your grandmother and aunt were quite the clothes horses!”

Electronics were my thing. Give me a t-shirt and some jeans and I was happy. But, as an artist, I still enjoy putting outfits together. Every month I find a day to snuggle up with my fashion magazines. I tear out pictures of looks that I like. I dig in my closet, often finding nuggets to recycle or up cycle as I like to think of it. Photographed are a couple of examples of ways to pull in current colors and styles without going shopping every season. Who knew, buried under a fat stack of scarves I swore I would wear to some equestrian event,(Who knows! This is a horse city!) that I had a pencil thin snake looking belt that is “so” today, as shown in a recent magazine article? I put it with a straight line skirt like the photo and a blousy top, adding an updated ankle bootie (who knew, I fought those for years but they are growing on me) and what was old is new again.

Now, I know, in sharing my secrets, I blow the image that all of us try to keep up, that we all shop every day, work out, play tennis and have nothing else to do with our time. I love being thrifty, and often frequent the second hand shops. What a gold mine to be in a college town where girls my size only wear something once then sell it!  I am not too proud to share that! 

I’ve been told by my mom to “dress my age”. NEVER! I say, appropriate, ok, but not my age! The sun we have to avoid to keep the wrinkles at bay. I have no control over the facets of gravity, but my clothing, I have every choice! And I will go down with as many options as I can muster or drag around.  Every little girl loves to dress up. Why should women be any different?Even if it is just to go the the grocery store! If we can’t still have fun dressing, then tell me, what is the point?

While I am not a professional fashionista, I do have friends who are. 

Here are some tips from some of my favorites:

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Photo:  Army Jacket

A recent article showed the new recycling of the “army jacket” (flashbacks anyone?)

Here I have taken mine from the 90’s, with photo of the article and up cycled with similar items I own.

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Yes, it is REDBOOK, but hey, I’m kinda liking the casual vibe, especially when temps are 

ranging from 30 in the morning to 72 in the afternoons.

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Get creative with color and magazine photos.Image

This years florals are the favorite. Feminine and fun.Image

Proof I am NOT a hoarder…but dang I wish I had those wedges back.Image

My closet BEFORE….color coding surely helps make the mornings easier. Image

 

Holy Spirit School presents ‘Alice in Wonderland’


 

My neighbor happens to be the director of this musical, Annie McClendon~

I was amazed and am including all photos I can. I also did one of the sets for them. I don’t have children at this school..but anything to help a friend.

Holy Spirit School’s Fine Arts department presented Disney’s rendition of Lewis Carroll’s Alice In Wonderland Jr. on November 15 and 16. The production was directed by Liz Berta, with music direction by Anne McClendon and choreography by Kate Berta. A packed house was on hand for opening night. Maggie McGuire played the main character of Alice, with Maria Phelps as Tall Alice and Madalyn Mitchell as Small Alice. Emily Mitchell performed in her thirteenth production performance as Rabbit.

Other cast members in Holy Spirit’s Alice in Wonderland Jr. included: Henry Pitts (Dodo), Kate Berta (Doorknob), Zan Jones (lead Caterpillar), Allie Albea (Cardsman), Brooke Bassett (Cardsman/Fish), Thomas Berta (Cardman/Lobster), Elizabeth Boykin (Flower/Tea Party), Ava Cicatiello (Flower/Tea Party), Pearl Davis (Two of Clubs), Eva Farrish (Flower), Cailyn Garrett (Flowers/ Tea Party), Taylor Higdon (Mushroom), Alyssa Higdon (Mushroom), Norah Hope (Caterpillar Body), Maddie Kirkland (Mushroom), Charli Kyser (Flowers/Tea Party), Catherine Kung (Flowers/Tea Party), Avery Lake (Lobster/ Cardsman), Sophie Livaudais (Caterpillar Body), Sarah Martin (Caterpillar Body), Sadie

McClendon (Tea Party/ Octopus), Bailey McLaurine (Mushroom), Mindy Mitchell (Flowers/ Tea

Party), Sailey Nichols (Lobster/Cardsmen), Dillan Olvera (Lobster/Cardmen), Anna Robbins

(Mushroom), Kate Robbins (Mushroom), Elizabeth Shore (Sea Creature/Cardsmen), Marie

McKane (Cheshire Cat 1), Nichole Louw (Cheshire Cat 2), Lisa Maggi (Cheshire Cat 3), Kate

Pitts (Tweedle Dee), Anna Pitts (Tweedle Dum), Danika Louw (Marche Hare), Mary Hope (Mad

Hatter), Reese Seale (Queen of Hearts), Sarah Williamson (Matilda), Rebecca Melton (Daisy),

Olivia Melton (Rose), Madison Dunton (Petunia), Izzy Sullivan (Violet), Audrey Shore (Tea

Party), Cecilla Walker (Lobster/Cardmen), Aden Walton (Caterpillar Body), and Berkley Young

(Flowers/ Tea Party).

Our neighbor and Ann Kats best friend in the hood is the little blue creature.

Our neighbor and Ann Kats best friend in the hood is the little blue creature.

Many volunteers helped make this production a great success, including the crew: Donny Mills, Ryan

Rainwater, Kiersten Schellhammer, Kat Robertson, Olivia Kapera, Leah Clark, Marian Cook,

Blanca Muniz, and Zach Davis.

The actors ranged in age from six years old to senior students, and the choreography was impressive. All of the age groups blended together beautifully with the help of stage manager Augusta Elebash.

The lighting design/tech direction by Donny Mims and Ryan Rainwater gave dimension and

made you forget you were in a school gymnasium. The sets and stages were all built for the production. Sets were created by the director and music director, parents who created costumes, friends and the Holy Spirit art department students.

This was the backdrop I painted. You can't have Alice without a BIG mushroom. These were painted on four foam core panels similar to the stuff that wreaked havoc in real estate in the 90's.

This was the backdrop I painted. You can’t have Alice without a BIG mushroom. These were painted on four foam core panels similar to the stuff that wreaked havoc in real estate in the 90’s.

Sponsors included Brian Prince Transmissions, Simply Twistin, Boyd’s Hairstyling, Body

Works Salon and Boutique, We Service Autos, Legal Shield, Stuart D. Albea Attorney, Norris

Radiator & Service Center, Southeaster Spine and Joint Specialist, Tuscaloosa Ear Nose and

Throat Center, Violins by Ray Leicht, University of Alabama Community Music School, Allison

Adams (painted mushroom set), LOS Construction and Roofing, Paragon Management Group, and Bama Bounders.

Photos: Allison Adams

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Video images helped create magical transitions.

Video images helped create magical transitions.

 

 

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allisonpadams.com

Summer Camps in Alabama Area


 

Summer Camp. Ah, the memories!  Every child should experience it. We all remember the uncertainty that initially hit us as we watched our parents ride away, leaving us for what they assumed to be “a part of growing up”. At pickup we didn’t want to leave what would perhaps become one of the most incredible experiences of our lives.

Summer camp these days is as varied as the children who attend. There is something for everyone. 

Listed are a number of great options, from local Tuscaloosa Camps, Regional, to camps in other states that Tuscaloosa area kids regularly attend.

Local Specialty Day Camps

DANCE

Academy of Ballet and Jazz, Open All Summer. Instructor Susu Hale Prout, Age 18 mo-adult, Mommy and Me, Pre-school, and intensives. 205-752-5124,  www.danceabj.com

The Dance Center, One week workshops beginning June 2. Ages 3-5 (Monday-Friday, 9-12:00)

Little Princess Camp: June 16-20; Broadway Babies- July 14-18; Ages 6-8 (M-F, 9-12:00);

“Angelina Ballerina”- June 2-6; “Pop Diva” Camp— July 7-11; Ages 7-10: “Tutus and Tilts”- June 23-27 (M-F 9-12); “Camp Radio Disney”- July 21-25 (M-F: 1-4PM).

TDC Summer Intensive Workshop with Guest Faculty: Week 1: June 9-13; Week II- July 28-Aug.1 (M-T, 10-6 PM). 205-752-5354, http://www.thedancecentre.net/

MJ’s Academy of Dance, Mary Jo Thompson, Summer Session: June 9-July 17. All styles and levels of dancing at affordable prices. Weekly Classes (all ages) $60 for 6 week session (meet once a week), $50 for each additional weekly class per session and sibling discounts. Dance Camps $136. Tights and Tiaras (Age 3-6) June 2-6:8-12, July 21-25, 8-12. Pop Idols (Age 7-11) June 2-6 8-12, July 21-25, 8-12. Dance Intensives: Age 11 and up) TBA. Pre-register 205-343-7757, dancemjs@gmail.com, www.mjsacademy.com

Hillcrest Shopping Center, 6521 Hwy. 69 S. Suite K, Tuscaloosa, AL 35405.

THEATRE

The ACT Summer Theatre Production Camp, July 21-26 9-2PM, all ages, cost $235. Geared for fun! T’shirt, script, lunches, and snack included. Performing at the Historic Bama Theatre. Workshops include songs, choreography, blocking and lines. 205-393-2800. www.theactonline.com

Tuscaloosa Children’s Theatre and Theatre Tuscaloosa join to present Theatre Camp 2014. Acting, improv, music, movement, audition techniques, technical theatre ending in a showcase performance June 27. Beginner or veteran will have lots of fun. K-11th grade. Drew Baker: thebakers35406@att.net or 205-310-8010/ 205-391-2277.

GYMNASTICS

Bama Bounders Gymnastic Camps and Classes

Erin Holdefer-Kightlinger owner. Open to all ability levels. Skills taught in vault, bars, beam and floor for girls as well as rings, parallel bars, high bar, pommel horse, vault and floor for boys. 

Full day and half day camp dates beginning June 2-Aug. 4

Gold Stars Camp- M-F 8-4pm, Girls and boys 5-14. Gymnastics, swimming, dance, games arts and crafts, Pizza Fridays, movies. 

Silver Stars Camp-M-F, 8-12, Girls and boys age 5-14, gymnastics, games, arts and crafts and more.

Bronze Stars Camp-M-F, 8-12, Girls and Boys age 3-5 (potty trained) Gymnastics, games, art projects, stories.

Before and after care available for additional fee. 

Preschool Playtime, Parent’s Night Out, Birthday Parties and Field Trips available. 205-722-2436, www.thebamabounders.com

FITNESS

Northridge Fitness Kid’s Strength Camp. 3 Days per week, age 11-15. Principles of proper body mechanics, developing core strength, weigh lifting safety. 205-752-1201, www.northridgefitness.net.

MARTIAL ARTS

Tiger Rock Martial Arts- 6 days a week for Martial Arts classes and four locations. Limited Number of spots for a “Train all Summer Program”. Tuscaloosa: 759-4711, Northport: 339-7071, Hillcrest: 343-6449.

SPORTS

University of Alabama Nike Tennis Camp

Two weeks of overnight camp and day camp:  Directed by Head Men’s Tennis Coach, George Husack, Women’s: Jenny Mainz, and Assistant Men’s Coach: Ryler DeHeart. Ages 9-18 (all levels) 8:30am-4pm. June 1-5/ June 8-12. Fundamentals of tennis to enhance skills. Evening activities games on the quad, swimming, movies, swimming and other activities. 30 courts outdoors and indoor facilities in case of rain. Check in: 3:00-4:00 Sunday at UA Varsity Stadium- dressed to play. Day Campers depart that afternoon at 6:30 after check in, evaluation and pizza party. Check out: Graduation: 3:00 pm Thursday at UA Varsity Stadium. Parents invited. 800-645-3226. www.USSportsCamps.com

University of Alabama Sports Camps: Offers a number of camps and clinics for the sports enthusiast, including 

Baseball Camp ~ Crimson Tide Experience Elite 40, June 30-July 2- $775. and summer youth baseball camps ranging from $140-225. http://collegebaseballcamps.com/bama

Cheer/ Dance Camp- Elementary Camps; Nick Saban Camp; Gymnastics Camp; Soccer Camp; Softball Camp; Swimming and Diving Camp; Tennis Camp (see above); Volleyball Camp; 

Go to the site for full information on all camps with links:

www.rolltide.com/camps/alab-camps.html

ART

Brushstrokes Summer Art Camps 

Sessions in June and July. June 2-12 (12:30-2:30 or 3:00-5:00) , June 16-26 (12:30-2:30), July 7-17 (12:30-2:30 or 3:00-5:00), July 21-31,(12:30-2:30), Teen Camp June 5,12,19,26,July 19,17, (Thurs. 9:30-11:30). $185.00 per student. $20 deposit. 205-657-0199, www.annsbrushstrokes.com/summer-camps/

COOKING 

On A Roll@ Fifth and Main, Northport. Young Chef’s Cooking Camp, M-F, July 7-11, July 21-25: 3:30-5:30. $200, includes supplies and ingredients and fun loving instruction in a safe, controlled environment. Chefs 9 years and up. 205-247-7773, Email: info@onarollnorthport.com

ALL AROUND CAMP FUN~

The Capitol School

Contact them for activities and flexible schedules. Summer Explorations 2014 with 2-week sessions of educational topics from June 2-August 8. Ages 2.5-18 years. Opens at 7:30 for working parents. Morning classes 8-noon, afternoon 1-5. Tuition $200 for 40 hours. Session 1: June 2-13, Session 2: June 16-27, Session 3: June 30-July 11 (July 4 Holiday), Session 4: July 14-25, Session 5: July 28-August 8. High School Term: June 9-July 31.

Located on historic Capitol Park at 2828 Sixth Street near downtown Tuscaloosa. 205-758-2828. Enroll online for Summer Explorations at www.thecapitolschool.com 

Children’s Hands-On Museum

CRAZY DAZE of Summer. Nine Weeks (50 days of crazed fun!) Kid Karaoke, Dueling Basketballs, Skee Ball, Foos-Ball, Air Hockey. LEGO CAMP. Fun events on special days.

Like on Facebook. www.chomonline.org

FLUM- Forest Lake United Methodist Church

Weekday Kids Program Summer Camp, Grade 1-7 where they can “Just Be a Kid”. 

Arts and Crafts, Daily Devotions, Bowling and Movie field trips, swimming, water days at Shelby Park, Games, Sports, Skating onsite, free t-shirt if enroll by 5/1/14. June 2 – August 1/ 14, 7:30-5:30 PM. $50 enrollment fee, $95/week or $25/day. Includes two snacks/day, supplies and field trips. 205-758-6623, Email: WDKSummerCamp@hotmail.com

Wee Camp (pre-K – 4) Field trips, on site activities. 

PARA-KIDS Summer Day Camp

Grades K-8 grade: Belk, Faucett, Miller and Phelps Centers, 7:30-5:45 PM, M-F.  Single day to weekly. $30 registration, Daily fee $27 or $81/ week. Activities: Exercise programs, swimming, archery, skating, bowling, softball, kickball, inflatables, arts and crafts, Riverworks Discovery and butterfly studies, Field Trips: Lake Lurleen and Alabama Adventure Park.Melinda Wiggins 205-562-3230, mwiggins@tcpara.org ,                                                                                    http://www.tcpara.org/page/35/day_camp_youth_events.html

Tuscaloosa Academy – Summer Knights Program

Ages 3-rising 8th graders. Also a program for ages 3-K taught by certified staff with special activities to help their development. Summer Adventure grades 1-8. Enrichment and Sports camp activities for the budding chef or sports enthusiast with camps teaching sports skills, express their creativity and stretch their minds. Half Day and Full Day from 7:30-5:30. 205-758-4462 ext. 513, summerknights@tuscaloosaacademy.org,  summerknights@tuscaloosaacademy.org.

Tuscaloosa Barnyard~ Summer Day Camp

Come learn about life on the farm away from TV and video games. Activities: Taking care of animals, boat ride, fishing, games, farm movies, hay rides, pony rides, horse training, arts and crafts, games, learning about nature. Slow paced environment. Kami:  205-248-0773. Space limited: 50% due at time of sign up.  www.tuscaloosabarnyard.com

MUSIC

The Community Music School (CMS)

School of Music at the University of Alabama Moody Music Building. University faculty and area professionals. Pre-K to all ages. Private Lessons age 5-adult: piano, band, orchestra, guitar, ukulele, organ, voice, French, Spanish. Offered June-July.

Kindermusik: Age 0-17mo,Age 18M-3Y, Age 4-6Y, Morning or afternoon, June-early July.

Camps:  Violin, Piano Camp OR Ukulele Camp Age 5-8:(One week: June 2-6 or July 28-Aug. 1-9:30-noon, $85); Kids Yoga; Beginning Guitar or Drums Camp-Age 8-12: (One week: June 2-6 or July 28-Aug. 1-9:30-noon, $85); Intro to Violin Camp Age 9-12: June 2-6, $85.

Musical Camp: Magic Tree House: The Knight at Dawn July 14-25, 9-noon M-F. 

Organizational Meeting 7/13, 6 PM. Show with speaking parts, solos, ensemble cast, songs, dialogue, costumes, staging, accompaniment. Practice CD included: $160.

Summer String Camp~ Grade 4-9. July 28-August 2, M-F: 8:30-4:30 p.m., Saturday 9:30-concert at 1. For students already playing instruments and able to read four strings and play in several keys. Teacher recommendation required. Snack prov., bring lunch. $250.

For info. call 205-348-6741, www.music.ua.edu/community-music-school.

Tuscaloosa Piano Studio, beginners age 5-11, July 14-18. Meets from 9-12 daily. Groups according to age. Recital at 11:00 on Friday. Cost: $120. which includes book. 205-454-7463.

Crimson Music Camps: Jazz Improvisation and Marching Percussion Camp: June 12-15; Band, Piano and Vocal/ Choral/ Opera Camp: June 15-20. bands.ua.edu/programs/crimson-camp, Heath Nails at jhnails@ua.edu205-348-6068.

LEARNING

The Long Weekend- Summer Multimedia Journalism- June 13-15, grades 6-12. $125. Teach creative and effective ways to communicate through writing, exploring magazines, yearbooks, literary magazines, broadcast programs. June 6 deadline for registration. asps.ua.edu. Meredith Cummings: aspa@ua.edu, 348-ASPA. 

Sylvan Learning Center ~ Writing, mathematics, study skills, specialty classes for state exams. 205-345-7676.

Tuscaloosa Public Library Summer Reading Program

All are FREE

Tommy Johns- Magic: Tuesday June 3, 2014: Weaver Bolden Branch: 9:30, Main Branch- 2pm, Wed. June 4: Main Library- 9:30, Brown Branch- 2pm http://tommyjohnspresents.com

Tom Foolery- Juggler- Tuesday, June 19, 2014: Weaver Bolden Branch- 9:30, Main library-2pm,

Wed. June11, Main library: 9:30, Brown Branch- 2 pm

Summer Safety Programs: Tues. June 17: Weaver Bolden Branch- 9:30, Main-2pm, 

Wed. June 18, Main- 9:30 am, Brown Branch- 2 pm

Kit Killingsworth- Bubble Fun: Tuesday July 15: Weaver Bolden Branch- 9:30 am, Main-2pm,

Wed. July 16: Main- 9:30 am, Brown Branch-2pm

Dr. Magical Balloons- Magic and Storytelling: Tues. July 22: Weaver Bolden Branch- 9:30am, Main- 2pm; Wed. July 23: Main 9:30 am, Brown Branch- 2pm. http://www.drmagicfun.com

4-H Animal Programs: Tues. July 29: Weaver Bolden-9:30 am, Main-2pm, 

Wed. July 30:Main-9:30, Brown Branch-2pm http://www.aces.edu/main/

The Bama Theatre: Movie Friday, Aug. 1: 10 am, doors open 9:30

Tuscaloosa Public Library, 1801 Jack Warner Parkway, Tuscaloosa, AL 35401, 205-345-5820,

www.tuscaloosa-library.org/

Alabama Museum of Natural History ~  History Expedition 36

Middle School Week: Grade 6-8) June 9-14; High School Week (Grade 9-12) June 16-24; Public Camp Week (all ages) June 23-28, museum.programs@ua.edu.

June- August Programs with Summer Field Trips including tubing, caving, fossil-hunting, canoeing in various areas around the state for families, students and children over the age of 10. Transportation and equipment provided. 205-348-7550. 

July 11: Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossil Trip; July 12: Canoeing on Bear Creek; July 15: Tubing the Little Cahaba River; July 17: Canoeing the Coosa River; July 19: Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossil Trip; July 29: Tubing the Little Cahaba River; July 31: Canoeing North River; August 1: Canoeing the Coosa; August 2: Shark’s Tooth Creek Fossil Trip; August 9: Shark’s Tooth Fossil Trip

Summer Camps at AMNH. Art Day Camp: June 2-6

Discover art and science for grades 3-5. Sculpture, painting and photography. 

Art Day Camp June 2-6,  Science Day Camp: July 21-25; email: museum.programs@ua.edu. 205-348-7550. Space is limited. 

Alabama Summer Computer Camps,Dept of Computer Science High School: July 21-25, July 28-Aug 1, Middle School: Aug 4-8 (includes computer, robotics, smartphone apps with App Inventor at the high school camps. outreach.cs.ua.edu/camps

Dr. Jeff Gray at gray@cs.us.edu 205-348-2847.

Camp Cash

College of Environmental Sciences, ages 11-14. Management skills, experiencing college life, enhancing confidence and self esteem, investing, insurance, wealth accumulation, and credit. Snacks, Camp T’shirt. Application at ches.ua.edu

Jan Brakefield, jbrakefi@ches.ua.edu205-348-8722.

CAMPS Within Driving Distance:

Lake Forest Ranch

Interdenominational Christian co-ed camp in East Central Mississippi on 60 acre Shadow Lake. (less than two hours from Tuscaloosa) Theme: Building Relationships for Eternal Impact. Activities: horseback riding, wild ride water tube, low and high ropes course, basketball, gym games, tennis, beach volleyball, swimming, fishing, canoeing, boating, archery, frisbee golf, game room/ arcade, paint ball course for teens, Bible Studies. Rick Malone: 662-726-5052, www.lakeforestranch.com.

Moundville Archaeological Park- Indian Day Camp

Session 1: June 2-6, Session 2: July 28-August 1. Ages 9-13. For kids interested in Native American arts and way of life. Focus on weaving, pottery, gourd crafts, hiking, gathering wild foods, touring museum and park, storytelling and sampling authentic Native American cuisine. From Tuscaloosa, a bus will meet at Smith Hall at the University of Alabama at 8:30 returning at 4:30 PM. Cost $200 per child per week. 205-371-8732, almorrow2@ua.edu , http://moundville.ua.edu

McWane Center- Summer Camps. Various topics each week with some overnight options. Morning sessions (9-12:30 and afternoon 1:00-5:00). 205-714-8414. http://www.mcwane.org/camps_and_more/camps/summercamp.

Nike Golf Camp~ Samford University, Birmingham Age 10-18. Overnight ($935)and Day Camp ($595)from 8:30-5pm. Hoover Country Club. July 20-24. 800-NIKE-CAMP. 

Riverview Camp for Girls: Mentone (3 hours from Tuscaloosa). Christian camp, ages 6-16. Cabins with bathrooms and showers. Photos downloaded each day of campers. Directors: Susan and Dr. Larry Hooks. Offers Mother-Daughter Weekends in April and August. 800-882-0722. Jennifer Fisher- Tuscaloosa’s Representative: ent3@comcast.net

 www.riverviewcamp.com

Camp Skyline Ranch- Mentone. Girls Christian Camp for ages 6-16. Various sessions. $3,217. for two weeks, 1725. for one week. June 8-August 1 (see website for session information). Arts and Crafts, Horseback Riding, Swimming, Archery, Dance, and other activities.  800-448-9279, www.campskyline.com

Space Camp- Huntsville Space and Rocket Center, Grades 4-6 (age 9-11). Summer $979/ person. Climbing wall, simulator, Spacedome Theater and Digital Theater. Begins on Sunday and ends on Friday Morning.Various topics from robotics, Space Academy, Aviation Challenge, to Day camps. See the site:  www.spacecamp.com/

Xcelerate Nike Girls Lacrosse Camp at Auburn University, Youth and High School , June 25-28. Age 10-18 Girls. 800-NIKE-CAMP.

ZooFari Camp at the Birmingham Zoo~ Grades 4K-8th Grade. 8:30-3:30 pm. May 27-Aug. 15, weeklong camps. Ranges from $200-260. Visit their site at www.birminghamzoo.com/education/ or 205-397-3877 or email education@birminghamzoo.com.

EQUESTRIAN

Valley View Ranch, A’top Lookout Mountain, Cloudland, Georgia. Six Sessions June – August ranging from $1500-2950. Limited to 60 girls. Hunt Club, Vaulters,Barrels, English, Stock Seat, Pony Club (younger campers). www.valleyviewranch.com, 706-862-2231.

National Programs:

JH Ranch ~ A camp teaching practical Christian Principles for everyday life. Headquarters in Birmingham. Ranch in California ~ http://jhranch.com/dates, Business Office :402 Office Park Drive, Suite 310, Birmingham, AL 35223, Toll Free: 1.800.242.1224

Jamey Abersold’s Summer Jazz Workshops, Louisville, Kentucky, $595.

  http://workshops.jazzbooks.com/, Workshops of varying levels in Jazz studies, 812-944-8141.